Pronouns

The pronoun substitutes for a noun or noun phrase to make communication easier. The noun replaced by the pronoun is called the antecedent. Some common examples are: I, you, he, it, they, me. The pronoun is a very common part of speech; using it correctly and clearly is important.
Subjective pronouns are used when the person or thing referred to is the subject of a sentence or clause. For example, in the sentence “I like ice cream,” the pronoun “I” is a subjective pronoun.
Objective pronouns are used when the person or thing referred to is the object of a sentence or clause. For example, in the command, “Call me tomorrow,” the pronoun “me” is an objective pronoun.
Possessive pronouns show possession, or who owns what. In the sentence “The comb is hers,” the pronoun “hers” is a possessive pronoun. Other examples include: mine, his, yours, theirs.
Indefinite pronouns refer to a nonspecific single or group of people and things. For example, in the sentence “Everyone loves Raymond,” the word “everyone” is an indefinite pronoun. Other indefinite pronouns include: somebody, anyone, nobody, either.
Reflective pronouns are used when the subject and the object of a sentence are the same. For example, in the sentence “We blame ourselves,” the word “ourselves” is a reflective pronoun referring to the subjective pronoun “we”. Other reflective pronouns include: myself, herself, itself, themselves.
It can be confusing if there are too many pronouns in a sentence, so antecedents should always be clear. The pronoun is a great tool to avoid repetition and shorten lengthy sentences.

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